Assistant Professor Raksangob Wijitsopon, Ph.D.
Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
Assistant Professor Bordin Chinda, Ph.D.
Chiang Mai University, Thailand
Associate Professor Arunee Wiriyachitra
Thailand

Featured Speaker:

Assistant Professor Raksangob Wijitsopon, Ph.D.

Affiliation:

Assistant Professor, Department of English, Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

Biography:

Dr. Raksangob Wijitsopon is an assistant professor at Department of English, Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. The areas of her research interests include corpus linguistics, stylistics and discourse analysis. She is particularly interested in the integration of these three perspectives in analyses of EFL learner writing, EFL textbooks and literary texts.

Title:

Key multi-word expressions in Thai learner English argumentative essays

Abstract:

Over the past decade, the concept of multi-word expressions (MWEs) has received extensive attention in foreign language teaching and learning research. The present study is different from previous studies on MWEs in that it applies the concept of keyness in corpus linguistics (Bondi and Scott, 2010) to an investigation of MWEs in a corpus of Thai undergraduates’ English argumentative essays (THAI) in comparison with a corpus of native speaker learners’ (NATIVE), via the software Wmatrix (Rayson 2008). The keyness approach throws light on individual MWEs that seem particularly characteristic of Thai EFL undergraduate writing. These key MWEs were then approached at the macro and micro levels. Systemic functional linguistic concept of language metafunctions: ideational, interpersonal and textual (Halliday and Matthiessen 2004) were applied to categorization of key items. These different functional groups of MWEs were analyzed in the light of distributional and lexicogrammatical patterns. These patterns reveal the ways in which Thai learner English writing tends to feature references to a large quantity and sources of information as well as a particular forceful tone in their argumentation. Findings from the study provide pedagogical implications for ways to improve EFL writing lessons.

References:

Bondi, M. and Scott, M. (2010). Keyness in Texts. London/ Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Halliday, M. and Matthiesen, C. (2004). ). An introduction to functional grammar. London: Routledge. Rayson, P. (2008). From key words to key semantic domains. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. 13 (4), pp. 519-549.

Featured Speaker:

Assistant Professor Bordin Chinda, Ph.D.

Affiliation:

Assistant Professor, English Department, Faculty of Humanities, Chiang Mai University, Thailand

Biography:

Dr. Bordin Chinda is an assistant professor at the English Department, Faculty of Humanities, Chiang Mai University. His research interests include language test validation, impact/washback studies, performance-based assessment, innovation in language education, professional development, and English for Academic Purposes. Bordin holds a PhD in Language Testing and Assessment from the University of Nottingham, UK.

Title:

CEFR in Thailand: Where are we going and where have we been?

Abstract:

Published in 2001 by the Council of Europe and its member states, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching, Assessment (CEFR) provides a comprehensive description of language ability, a set of illustrative descriptor scales for language proficiency levels, and guidelines for curriculum design. Since its publication, the CEFR has been playing an influential role in language education not only across Europe but also worldwide. With a rising concern on the nation’s English proficiency level, some parts of Thailand’s English education system have decided to adopt the CEFR. For example, one of the Office of Higher Education Commission’s English language education policies is that all tertiary students are required to take an English proficiency test, which, has to be equivalent to the CEFR or other standards. This paper, therefore, will describe the roles of CEFR in English language learning and teaching in Thailand. Also test development projects based on the CEFR as well as CEFR aligned tests in Thailand will be explored. Finally, a validation project to align a locally produced test to the CEFR B1 level will be explained.

Featured Speaker:

Associate Professor Arunee Wiriyachitra

Affiliation:

Associate Professor, Thailand

Biography:

Associate Professor Arunee Wiriyachitra is a teacher, author and teacher educator. She is now a freelancer in many fields of education. Her publications include numerous articles, published nationally and internationally. She has also written many textbooks for secondary and tertiary education.

Title:

CEFR in Thailand: Where are we going and where have we been?

Abstract:

Published in 2001 by the Council of Europe and its member states, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching, Assessment (CEFR) provides a comprehensive description of language ability, a set of illustrative descriptor scales for language proficiency levels, and guidelines for curriculum design. Since its publication, the CEFR has been playing an influential role in language education not only across Europe but also worldwide. With a rising concern on the nation’s English proficiency level, some parts of Thailand’s English education system have decided to adopt the CEFR. For example, one of the Office of Higher Education Commission’s English language education policies is that all tertiary students are required to take an English proficiency test, which, has to be equivalent to the CEFR or other standards. This paper, therefore, will describe the roles of CEFR in English language learning and teaching in Thailand. Also test development projects based on the CEFR as well as CEFR aligned tests in Thailand will be explored. Finally, a validation project to align a locally produced test to the CEFR B1 level will be explained.